JOB SEARCH / JUN. 22, 2015
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5 Jobs For Cat Lovers

The oldest domesticated specimen of cat is 9,500 years old and was found in a grave in Shillourokambos, Cyprus alongside its human owner. This 2004 finding quashed the long accepted belief that cats were first domesticated in Ancient Egypt almost 4,000 years ago, where they were pretty much considered sacred.

And as the late Terry Pratchett once said, “They have never forgotten this.”

Neither have the crazy cat ladies (and lads!) the world over. As well as the much discussed health and mental benefits of owning a cat (or, in my case, six – I’m practically immortal), cats are the most popular pet in Europe and North America with over 96 million kitties kept as pets in the US alone compared to the 80 million pet dogs.

While some argue (irrationally, might I add) pigeons will one day take over the world, cats already have. Proof of that is our need to watch cat videos on YouTube all day. But what if I told you that you could feed your insatiable love of cats by working in one of these 5 jobs?

See Also: 5 Jobs for Animals Lovers

1. Cat Café Owner

The world’s first cat café opened in Taiwan in 1998, but it wasn’t until quite recently that the trend started to pick up in Europe and the United States. Cat cafés are visited by locals who cannot keep a cat as a pet and even by tourists, and they are usually fully booked a month or so in advance. Essentially people visit the cat cafés and pay to play with cats. Sounds like a pretty good business model to me. In addition to making a profit from serving food and drinks on the premises, you can charge a small admission fee – most cafés put this toward cat food and veterinary bills.

2. Catnip Seller

Known as the drug dealer of the cat world, this job entails growing and selling catnip for a living. A bag of catnip seeds costs a little under $2, and you can make a huge profit by selling toys/pouches filled with dried catnip leaves on websites like Etsy or you could even approach your local pet shop to stock your products.

3. Cat Furniture/Enclosure Builder

If you’re quite the handyman (or woman) and have built Lucy and Felix their own little playhouse from scratch, you might want to consider making a business out of it. Cat owners even buy outdoor enclosures for their feline friends who they would prefer wandering outside in a safe, controlled environment. These enclosures often include tunnels, bridges, towers, and stairs, and can cost up to $500 – or more, depending on how much time goes into building the enclosure and how complicated it is.

4. Cat Sitter

Cat sitters typically earn about $10 an hour, and you could potentially make $240 a day just by looking after someone else’s cat while they’re away on holiday or on a business trip. You’ll basically get paid to pet a cat all day, and owners usually pay for all the food and expenses (the cat’s and yours). You could even start your own cat boarding business and welcome kitties into your home while their mummies and daddies are out of town for a few days.

5. Professional Cat Catcher

If neither of the jobs listed above interest you, you might want to take a page out of Jordana’s Serebrenik’s book and start your own cat-catching business. Serebrenik quit her job as a lawyer in 2012, and began charging $80 to catch customers’ cats and safely coax them into pet carriers for their visit to the Very Evil Twit (VET).

See Also: Are you a Cat Person or a Dog Person?

I think many of you will agree with me that working with cats would be the best. Thing. Ever. Heck, I would do it for free. I’m seriously considering a career change – feline lap surrogate sounds so much cooler than writer.

Can you think of any other jobs for cat lovers you’d like to add to this list? Let me know in the comments section below! Also, if you’re leaving for Aoshima - or Cat Island - can I come with you? Please?

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