Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
LEADERSHIP / JUL. 10, 2013
version 2, draft 2

5 Signs that You're a Weak Leader

When working a managerial or executive level position, you are not only responsible for your own workload and goals, but also of those in your team. Whether your team consists of 2 people of 20, it is integral that you recognize your position as a leader and take the necessary measures to make the team as productive and efficient as possible.

Here are the top 5 signs of a bad leader – if you have any of these, it is time to review your role and become a better manager!

You think that you know everything

While you maybe in a high level position, it is not possible that you are the best at everything. Make sure you scout your team to find individuals who have different areas of expertise. Listen to their opinions during meetings and discussions in order to obtain a better insight. Good leaders are those who recognize the strengths in their team, rather than think they know the best of everything.

Your default status at work is busy

Many managers and bosses have the misconception that their role gives them the right to always be busy. That is not a sign of too much responsibility and more workload, but a sign of someone who has poor organization skills. Make sure you make time for your staff when they have conflicts and listen to feedback, rather than explain your busy schedule to everyone who walks in the door to tell you their problem.

Your feedback is not helpful

Performance reviews are a vital part of any employment contract. Employees have a periodical meeting with their manager to discuss their achievements and issues in the workplace. A shocking number of managers delay scheduling this meeting with their employees, and actually avoid giving any substantial feedback. An employee appraisal is not a time to criticize and be negative, but a chance for you to have a discussion about achievements, goals and workplace issues.

You think you are always right

As a manager, you do not have the divine position to always be right and know the most. There are times when managers have failed to recognize issues and it is advised that you take a step back to review your role. Everyone makes mistakes, what is important is that you recognize your mistake, ratify it and give appreciation to the employees who make you look good in front of your boss.

You don’t want others to take charge

“Delegate” is a word that has been deleted from your dictionary. Taking charge is part of your job; however a good leader is someone who allows others to take charge and progress in their watch. Instead of hogging the limelight all the time, it is advised that you let others in your team take the lead once in a while – this not only trains them for the future but helps you pick out the best employees. 

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