CHANGING CAREERS / APR. 25, 2015
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5 Ways to Leave a Lasting Impression Before Quitting

If you’re thinking about resigning soon, you may want to consider following a few of these advisable tips.

Quitting is so much more than preparing yourself for a new venture or career move. You want to leave a memorable departure—one that makes your employer and colleagues remember you as a hardworking and honest worker.

Here are a few ways you can leave a lasting impression:

See Also: How To, When and Why You Should Quit Your Dream Job

1. Stay Positive

Don’t make this a bitter moment for you and your coworkers. Stay optimistic and upbeat at all times. Try not to dwell on the negative aspects of the job. Instead, constantly remind yourself of all the great times you’ve had while working there.

Depending on the situation, you may have certain feelings about your departure. Avoid talking bad about the job while at work or even outside the office. If you’re departing on your own terms, then make sure you continue to smile and have a good attitude. Your boss will definitely take into account how your demeanor is up until your last day. So, don’t make it too obvious that you’re overly excited or depressed about leaving.

2. Stay on Task

Put in as much effort as you can before you leave. Stay on task at all times and don’t slack off. Even though your last days are approaching, you are still getting paid for your labor. Therefore, finish up any important last minute projects or assignments. Complete all your work so that coworkers won’t have to pick up the slack for you.

Don’t get too complacent with the thought of leaving that you become lazy at the last minute. Giving your all right before you quit will make your colleagues remember you on a good note.

3. Don't Keep It a Secret

Be as transparent as possible with your boss about resigning. You shouldn’t feel embarrassed or ashamed about quitting. Let them know what day you’ve scheduled as your last day at the office. Also, make a note that before informing your colleagues about your departure, you should always make sure your employer knows first. It would be unprofessional on your part if your boss found out by word-of-mouth.

As stated by managing director of Leveraged Potential Consulting Michele Gorman: “Don’t keep your departure a secret for too long. Your departure will be a loss to your customers and colleagues, and it’s important to give them time to transition."

4. Submit Your Notice on Time

That brings us to our next point: provide a timely two weeks’ notice. Sometimes employers don’t require it if you’ve only been on the job for a certain amount of time, like a 90-day probation period. However, if that’s not the case, then you should be presenting your notice in enough time for the company to hire someone else to replace you.

Additionally, offer to help your employer transition from an experienced worker to a newbie. Help train the new employee with all the knowledge they need to know about the position they’re trading with you.

5. Show Your Appreciation

Lastly, leave with a sense of appreciation. Not just for all that you have obtained from working with the company, but for your employer(s) and colleagues as well. Gorman suggests that "While you are leaving for a reason, it’s important that you make sure that colleagues know that they were missed, and that they added [something] to your life."

Leave short and sweet personalized thank-you letters to some of your coworkers expressing how much value they brought to your workday. Also, plan to go out to lunch together so you can end the relationship with a little bit of bonding. Remember to ask them to write recommendation letters for you or get permission to use them as a reference. Showing them how much you will miss them will surely make them miss you even more.

See Also: Your Company May Be Using an Algorithm to Decide If You Are About to Quit

Whether you’re being laid off or quitting for personal reasons, remember to exit respectfully and professionally. Leaving on a good note at any job guarantees that former colleagues will always have something positive to say about your work ethic in the future.

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Fast Company
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