WORK-LIFE BALANCE / JUL. 09, 2015
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Are There Limits for Self Improvement

self improvement
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Human beings are hardwired for improvement. We always seem to want more, bigger and better. We want more money, a bigger house, a better job. When it comes to the quest for self improvement, is there a limit to what we can achieve?

See Also: 5 Ways to Improve Yourself

Many of us were taught as children that we could accomplish anything. But in real life, we often encounter limitations that prevent us from becoming the person we want to be. But are they real limits, or are they obstacles we can overcome? What are these things holding us back from our self improvement goals?

Improving Physical Appearance

In the pursuit of an optimal physical condition, we may exercise, eat for nutrition, and try to push the limits of our endurance. We make massage appointments, have our hair cut, get waxed, and lay for hours in the sun to obtain a healthy glow. Some people even go so far as to have plastic surgery to correct imperfect noses or hide the signs of aging. 

But, there’s only so far we can go in order to improve our physical appearance. We can dress well, eat right and exercise. But we’re born with what we’re born with, and there are limits to what, even a skilled plastic surgeon, can achieve with our physical bodies.

Improving Social Skills 

If you could ask any successful public speaker, such as Tony Robbins or Suze Orman, you’d discover that they didn’t always possess such well-spoken powers of persuasion. Tony Robbins was once an overweight, lonely, broke bachelor living in a tiny efficiency apartment. Suze Orman was born with a speech impediment into a family that struggled financially. Tony and Suze are now well-respected global public speakers and social influencers. These are just two examples of people who prove that an improvement in social skills is possible and limitless. Whether you are shy, can’t speak well, or are isolated emotionally or physically, you can definitely overcome the challenges.

Improving Career

Everyone wants to get a promotion along with a raise. Improving a career, however, usually takes hard work, commitment and dedication. If we’re willing to do those things, shouldn’t career improvement be limitless? Unfortunately, there are often impediments to improving a career.

  • A lack of proper education could prevent you from being a candidate for the next level up at your company. Even if you are a great employee, if the corporate job qualification includes a Master’s Degree and you only hold a Bachelor’s you won’t be on the list of potential candidates. 
  • Another impediment to your career could be discrimination. If the ethics at your company are imperfect, you could be held back based on your race, religion or political views.
  • A third, and equally formidable obstacle to your career advancement could be your own personal fear. You could have a transparent belief about yourself that keeps you from applying for a managerial position. You may be afraid of the extra responsibility or the amount of time it might take away from your family. This third hindrance however, can be overcome, but not without some deep introspection.

See Also: 10 Questions to Ask Yourself Everyday For a Better Tomorrow

In light of these considerations, the final verdict seems that some self improvement goals are limitless, while others may fall into the hands of fate. But there is a way that your self improvement can become limitless.

If you stop allowing others to cloud your judgment of who you are, what you should look like, how you should behave and how much you should earn, you might discover that you only need a little self improvement or none at all. When you can find a way to be content with your current self, there may actually be no limit to what you can accomplish.

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