Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
CHANGING CAREERS / AUG. 05, 2014
version 16, draft 16

How to Change Career Using Risk Assessment Models

Are you contemplating a career change? Not sure if you should or shouldn’t? Feels a little too risky? Will it be a wise move in the long run? Like the image above, sometimes it may feel like you’re looking into the eye of the storm. 

Should this be the case then this article is directly aimed at you, as well as the many others, struggling to decide whether or not to take the plunge - stuck in the midst of a career change assessment.

If you’re in a job now, and also considering a new job, then you have 2 options: stick with your current job or take the leap to change careers. With this in mind the following article identifies 2 risk management models which can be, almost stolen if you like, and used to support your all important career change decision. The first model is an Active Risk Manager (ARM) and can when used to assess the new career risks directly. The second template is a personalised way for you to self evaluate and also research ahead to establish if you will be as happy as you anticipated.

The information below is designed as a stencil for you to adopt, use this to fill in your own answers and apply to your own situation. Feel free to remove the brackets and use the space accordingly; try to keep the stencil in line with the image as a guide. Change the questions, edit the content, ask yourself the questions to which you would like to know the answers... 

Model 1

http://www.sword-activerisk.com/wp-content/uploads/img_simplifying_enterprise_risk.jpg

Active Risk Manager (ARM)

1: ....................................................................................................................................................................  

(Identify your immediate risks; current job security? New career/company staff turnover? Salary comparisons? Working hours?)

2: ....................................................................................................................................................................

(Role and duty analysis; are you competent to meet the demands of the new role?)

3: ....................................................................................................................................................................  

(Time control. If you choose to proceed, what dates are in your contract? When would be the best moment?)

4: ....................................................................................................................................................................

(Are you qualified? Would you be better prepared after attending additional courses and/or training?)

5: ....................................................................................................................................................................

(Will more opportunities to progress become available? Can you use these to drive your own success?)

6: ....................................................................................................................................................................

(Where would you be happier in 5 years? With your employer, or in the new company? What are your long term goals?)

Prioritise your risks, once you’ve assessed the threats, you should then also begin to develop a plan that will help you to avoid that particular risk, should it come into view once you have made the decision to change jobs. Before that does happen, ensure that you have built your own contingency plan in the case that a risk does actually materialise.

Model 2

http://grist.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/adaptation-risk-based.jpg

Limits to Adaptation

Research your new company as much as possible. A variety of tools are at your disposal - such as social media or if possible you could establish a connection with either an (current or former) employee and/or recruitment consultant -  and find a way to bounce your questions off a reliable source.

Once you have your answers, you may find that in reality the job is different from what you anticipated.

Consider the following attributes below and replace the question in the brackets with your own answers/skills/keywords/views - however you decide to answer – ensure you keep the letter (A, B, C) next to your answer.

Then place the letter in the chart and decide how comfortable you are with the level of adaptation that will be required based on distance between "Acceptable" and "Intolerable" or "Negligible" and "Catastrophic", try to really use this to find out if the move will be effortless, or complex and intricate for you as a professional. And ultimately find out, if you will be happy.

A)...........................................................................................................................................................                

(What new policies will I need to adapt to?)

B) ..........................................................................................................................................................                  

(Are my skills transferable to this new career? Am I really suited?)

C) ..........................................................................................................................................................                

(How difficult will the training be? How will I adjust to the new workload? 

D) ..........................................................................................................................................................                    

(Is this career a good fit for my social life and/or dependants? Hours? Weekends? Overtime?)

E) ..........................................................................................................................................................                  

(Can I afford to make this change right now? Can I afford to make the change at all?)

F) ..........................................................................................................................................................                  

(How will I tackle unforeseen obstacles?)

G) ...........................................................................................................................................................                  

(Can I handle the presumed timeframe for long-term prospects?)

H) ..........................................................................................................................................................                    

(Do I have realistic expectations? When I’m there, will it be as I hoped?)

Should you feel other questions are more appropriate to your role, tailor the list to your own situation. Once both question lists and charts have been filled in, cross reference your (ACR) risk assessment answers with your adaptation chart answers.

Career and executive coach Anita Attridge, explains there are two important aspects to reflect upon when contemplating a career change.

“The first is to clearly understand what you want to do; the second is to understand what the marketplace will allow you to do,” says Anita.

Finally, you need to know what is held as important to the hiring managers in this new field, and what skills and experience are required. Overall, you need to also establish if you are capable to deliver the results needed in the new job.

We hope that once these have both been identified, you are now in a better position of judgment towards your career change decision. And remember, these are your risks – the things which can go wrong - they are separate from your list of positive reasons to move jobs, which is what drove you to research and attracted you to the position in the first place - also hold these in high regard during your evaluation. 

 

Sourced image: Risk Management 

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