Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
SALARIES / JUN. 20, 2014
version 4, draft 4

How to Handle a Non-Negotiable Salary Offer

There comes a time when a careerist has exhausted all work prospects available and is left with a list of not-so-desirable job vacancy options at his/her disposal. Most of these undesirable jobs have two exceptional characteristics. The first one is low pay and the second is that the pay is fixed and non-negotiable. This calls for you to play hard-ball since on many occasions, companies with non-negotiable salary offers tend to have a military mentality when dealing with their employees. And hence, to avoid being taken advantage of, we should ask ourselves, how does one handle a non-negotiable salary offer?

#1 Be Emotionally and Psychologically Prepared

Many companies offering non-negotiable salaries unfortunately presume that an employee's well-being is 'okay' despite prevalent inflationary effects on living standards. They also consciously mistreat and overwork them since they take advantage of their desperation when hiring them in the first place. These companies also have the 'take it or leave it' mentality especially if employees are disgruntled with legitimate issues to be addressed. You'll therefore have to avoid naivety by bracing yourself for the possibilities of a hard time in the workplace, because as we all know, not all jobs are a bed of roses.

#2 Calculate your Salary Threshold to meet Basic Monthly Expenses

Some employees unfortunately run to their parents, friends and family to meet their monthly expenses. Reason being that the non-negotiable jobs they clinched came with more unexpected and costly expenditures which couldn't be met by their meager pay. That's why you should calculate the basic monthly expenses to be incurred considering the fact that every city has its own basic cost of living. You should also ensure that there is some extra cash for miscellaneous expenses which tend to haunt us in the notorious form of impulse buying. That being said, it wouldn't be wise to live on the bare minimum since it would ultimately amount to slavery.

#3 Determine the Wealth of Experience to be gained

Indeed, it would be a sacrifice on your part to accept a non-negotiable salary offer. However, the question we should ask ourselves is, will it be worth the sacrifice in the end? Will it propel you to achieve your career milestones as you advance closer to your career goals? Will you gain enough exposure to significantly advance your career reputation. Will it be a key stepping stone for you to meet and interact with key industry players that might connect you to better opportunities? Such questions should help us to seriously ponder on the true value of non-negotiable offers because if the job is a means to living on the bare minimum, then career stagnation will be your inevitable fate.

#4 Inquire about Incentives and other Employee Benefits

Fortunately, there are some exceptional non-negotiable job offers that come with incentives and benefits that might actually surpass your basic salary. If your company caters for your housing, transport, pension fund and medical insurance, then you're one of the lucky few. However, incentives are not limited to these categories since some companies go as far as giving you a car or a house which you can use at your discretion. They might even give you complete ownership of the properties altogether if you've served for a significant number of years. Again, as was previously mentioned, such opportunities are very rare.

#5 Ensure that the job isn't too demanding

From my prior work experience, the non-negotiable clause tends to extend beyond the salary offer. There's a high possibility that you'll be required to be strict with time and discipline in the workplace. You might also find yourself being told to work extra hours with little or no compensational benefits whatsoever. You should also expect a rude and domineering boss or CCTV cameras monitoring your every move. Rest and social interaction will also be regarded with much disdain by your superiors and on many occasions, you'll feel exhausted and frustrated. If you're ready to embrace this, then good luck. I can't stop you.

#6 Have an Exit Strategy 

Being a careerist doesn't necessarily mean that you're perfect and mistakes will definitely happen. One of the mistakes might be the non-negotiable job offer that you took and after much thought, you found much fault and decided to call it quits. However, you've got to consider the lawful repercussions on your part if you breach any contract you had initially subscribed to. There's also the possibility that you'll get an unfavourable recommendation if you don't come up with a convincing reason that won't offend your superiors. All in all, an exit strategy would be a wise contingency measure to avoid the possibility of making a rash, dramatic and unprofessional abrupt exit with detrimental consequences on your part.

#7 Polish on your Employee Rights Awareness

Are you aware of worker rights that pertain to your country? If not, then there's a high possibility you'll be taken advantage of once you accept the non-negotiable job offer. Employee rights range from the minimum pay to number of maximum working hours, necessary incentives and work-place environment, just to name a few. Having these rights at your fingertips will give your superiors the impression that there will be lawful consequences if they violate any of your rights.

#8 Consult Career Experts, Mentors and Acquaintances

No man is an island and careerists are not exempted from this rule. There are colleagues who have been with us every step of the career ladder, correcting us, advising us and showing us the way when we were in the dark. A non-negotiable job offer might be the darkness you're trying to unravel and thus, you'll need advice from mentors, experts and acquaintances. These can range from close friends to former class mates, siblings and even our parents. Their prior experiences can give you the much needed wisdom you'll need once you accept that job offer.

Contrary to popular belief, not all non-negotiable salary offers are unattractive. With the current global economic recession, big companies have also joined the non-negotiable wagon to execute sound financial discipline in their expenditures. All in all, it calls for you to be strong, patient and tolerant to the hardships of accepting non-negotiable salary offers by focusing on the ultimate prize of career progress. As the saying goes, 'Quitters never win and winners never quit.'

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