Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
WEB & TECH / FEB. 08, 2015
version 4, draft 4

In the Name of Progressing Unscrupulous Science

Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein in 1818 and it is about a scientist, Doctor Victor Frankenstein, who created a monster with parts of cadavers he had dug up. Dr. Frankenstein, firstly, is fictional; secondly, his experiment that created a grotesque monster-person is mildly amusing and playful compared to these real life retched researchers.

Progress for the sake of progress, at least on paper

Stem cell research was coined as the Holy Grail for the advancement of the biomedical sciences. The thing is, according to a survey conducted by New Scientists, many of the results are rushed to publication without the finding being substantiated or reliably replicated (which is kind of important when you’re coming up with cures for life threatening diseases). Some participates in the survey went as far as to say that results that do not support the hypothesis often get overlooked completely.

The 60.000 clinical drug trails that are conducted outside the U.S.

The FDA (the Food and Drug Administration) is an agency in the U.S. that regulates, if you haven’t figured it out yet, food and drugs. Within its scope of action, it also regulates clinical drug trails. Knowing how desperate and nefarious big Pharma is to turn a profit, the FDA makes sure that those trails don’t hurt, maim or kill any human subjects. This is enforced by tomes upon tomes of regulations that nefarious big Pharma can’t get around. At least in the U.S. They found out that there is no such thing as the F.D.A. in other countries, and especially in Third World Countries there isn’t even a localized equivalent of the F.D.A. So what if your drugs make people grow donkey ears? There’s no F.D.A. to stop you now.

Tons of ‘conditioning’ experiments

Psychologists in previous years ran rampant because the lingering, long term effects of their science were not understood very well. Yet, there were a myriad of unethical conditioning studies that were done of pretty much every species imaginable. If you are unfamiliar with the term ‘conditioning,’ it’s what you would call acquiring a skill via the method ‘being beaten into you’. The most famous or infamous is Pavlov’s dog. A bell would ring every time the dog would receive food. Eventually, anytime the dog heard the bell it would start to salivate, expecting food. Because Pavlov is a sadistic bastard, the dog was then put in a cage with two sections. When the bell rang, the floor of one side would become electrified, resulting in the dog jumping to the other side. Now every time the dog heard the bell it would jump to the other side. Because Pavlov probably giggles gleefully as he seriously injures sweet old ladies by throwing kittens at them, the experiment added another component. A little disclaimer at this point: if you like animals as much as I do/have a soul, then don’t continue reading, because this last part made my stomach turn. Pavlov then rang the bell and electrified both sides of the cage. After this happening enough times, the dog would just sit and quiver waiting for the electricity to stop. Afterwards, anytime the poor pup heard the bell, it quivered expecting a shock.

The Little Albert experiment was conducted by less than honourable, John B. Watson in the 20s. Basically, he gave the infant an assortment of fuzzy white objects and when the child attempted to play with them, a loud startling noise sounded, scaring the child. After repeating this horrible excuse of an experiment enough times, the child would be scared by anything fuzzy including blankets and beards. With the conclusion of the experiment, Little Albert was returned to his parents fully traumatized and without reversing the conditioning he received. He later grew up to live in a house completely made of glossy materials such as fiberglass, plastic and marble. Actually, I just made up that last part, but I mean after infant trauma like that how could he live around anything plush?

Do you think these experiments were necessary for the progress of science? Are there any other experiments that I missed that you might want to add to this disgraceful list? Then let me know in the comment section below.      

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