CAREER DEVELOPMENT / DEC. 23, 2014
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Jack of All Scrubs: Diverse Careers You Can Pursue After Nursing School

When you imagine the day-to-day work of a nurse, you might picture them confined to the white walls of a hospital under fluorescent lighting, eating their lunch out of a vending machine. While many nurses work in hospitals and clinics, obtaining a nursing degree also opens up plenty of exciting career opportunities that won’t confine you to a “typical” nurse’s role. Keep reading to learn about a few nursing careers that offer variety and diversity for those with nursing skills.

Cruise Ship Nurse

Nurses can sail the seas and visit exotic ports while working aboard a cruise ship. Cruise ships have a full medical crew that consists of doctors and nurses who provide routine and emergency care to both the ship’s crew members and passengers. Nurses typically work shifts of 8-12 hours and are free to leave the ship at a port of call if they are not on duty. Nurses on board handle a variety of tasks such as drawing blood, administering routing medications, taking x-rays and performing emergency lifesaving procedures. A nurse will typically spend 6-8 months on-board before taking a break from cruising to return home for a few months.

Summer Camp Nurse

Ever wish you could go back to summer camp? Believe it or not, nurses are required on legitimate summer camp staffs across the nation. Camp nurses provide emergency and routine care to campers and other staff members. They conduct health screenings on each camper, educate campers and staff about ways to avoid injuries, administer medications and treat minor injuries such as cuts and bug bites. Sometimes they just have to help a first-time camper deal with their homesickness. While most duties are routine, camp nurses must be prepared to handle a full blown life-threatening emergency should one arise. If you enjoyed summer camp in your youth, like working with kids, or love being outdoors, this might be the perfect position for you.

Travel Nurse

If you have the desire to travel while you work, this niche in the nursing field might be a perfect fit for your career. Travel nurses work through a staffing agency and accept temporary assignments in the United States or abroad. The typical assignment is from 4 to 13 weeks, but some may last as long as 26 weeks. Assignments abroad are typically longer, with some lasing 1 to 2 years. Most positions come with perks like a stipend for housing and a higher than average hourly pay rate. At the end of the assignment, nurses are often offered a permanent position if they wish to stay. If not, they are free to fulfil the next temporary position, while a local nurse takes their place.

Hospice Nurse

The job of a hospice nurse is both demanding and rewarding. Hospice nurses are involved in all aspects of a patient’s care during the end-stage of the patient’s life. The focus of hospice care is pain relief and the physical and emotional comfort of the patient. Nurses also work closely with family members as they come to terms with the patient’s death. Hospice care is usually provided in the home of the patient or a family member. While hospice work can be very rewarding for some nurses, dealing with loss can take an emotional toll and hospice nurses must practice self-care to avoid burn-out.

These fields represent only a few of the many options open to nurses. A nursing career doesn’t have to mean long shifts in a hospital or clinic, or years staring at the same walls. For those who have a desire to help people, nursing is a dynamic and versatile career choice.

The information for this article was provided by the professionals of Norwich University who offer a master of science in nursing online.

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