JOB SEARCH / JAN. 25, 2016
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Real Reasons Overqualified Job Seekers Are Rejected

Has an employer ever told you that you are too good for the job? This means that you are overqualified. Despite the fact that being overqualified is considered to be a bad thing, that’s not always the case. I mean of course not getting an offer, for this reason, can be disappointing but that can never be as bad as not being skilled or experienced enough for the job right? At least, you do know you are good at your job.

However, it seems to have the same result. When you are overqualified, the response you get from employers is that you are not a good fit for the job, either because your educational status tells them you will be asking for a lot of money or you are just too old. But is this really the case? What do employers mean when they say ‘you are overqualified’ for the job?

See Also: How to Handle Being Told ‘You’re Overqualified’ in Interviews

According to Liz Ryan, contributor to Forbes, being told you are ‘overqualified’ can mean that you are “too smart” or “too old” or so competent that you are more likely to be unhappy in the job if it was offered to you. It might also mean that your job experience has ‘freaked them out’ – as Liz points out, so much so that they believe you could do their jobs better.

Employers use this annoying excuse for not giving you the job for various reasons but in their defence, they are forced to think about the long-term benefits of their company before making a decision about you.

So, in case you are wondering, these are the real reasons you are getting rejected when employers tell you that you are overqualified for the position:

1. They Don’t Have The Money

This doesn’t come as a real shock as employers are concerned about how much they need to pay you. Since you have too much experience for the open position, it is only fitting that you will need to earn a salary that is higher than the budget employers have agreed on in the first place. While this may not sound fair to you, employers may be doing you a favour since they are implying that you are worth a lot more than they are offering.

2. You Won’t Stay For Long

steve-jobs-movie-garage
CNN

Employers may be concerned about the fact that you are going to abandon them as soon as a better opportunity comes along. Being highly skilled and more experienced than other candidates, means that other employers – who can give you what you need, will want you to be part of their team. Since recruiting a new hire and then losing one too quickly costs the company lots of money, they’d prefer not to invest in you by saying that you’re just too qualified for the job.

3. You Will Get Bored

In a way, being told you overqualified is for your own benefit. Think about it: If you got a job that you are too skilled for, the tasks you are given would probably be too easy for you. You would be in a job that isn’t as challenging for you or as exciting as you would have hoped. It is better not to settle for a job that’s beneath you just to have something to pass the time. Life is too precious for that.

4. You Will Have a Younger Boss

Perhaps you are overqualified because your prospective employer is younger than you. While that’s not a problem on its own, if employers think that your relationship with your younger manager will give you or them trouble, then they won’t hire you. Usually, this happens when the young boss doesn’t know how to manage an employee who is older than him or doesn’t know how you would respond to their authority.

5. You Will be a Competitor

henry cavill posing
CNN

Lastly, if you are told you are overqualified, it might simply mean that your manager or boss is too insecure about their own skills and experience. So when a candidate who is more skilled and has the potential to become a manager himself in the nearer future comes along, they’d prefer to push him away in fear that one day they will have to compete with you.

See Also: How to Write a Resume if You Are Overqualified for the Job

If you have ever been told you are overqualified for a job, then you might need to dumb down your CV. But would you ever do that to get a median job when you know you can shoot higher? Let me know your thoughts in the comments section below…

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