Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
WORKING ABROAD / DEC. 27, 2012
version 22, draft 22

Slovakia Public Sector Employment

Legislation governing the public sector

Public sector employment in Slovakia is commonly referred to as civil service employment. The 2009 Civil Service Act regulates the sector and provides specific guidelines and legislation for civil servants in the country. Another applicable act is the 2003 Act on work performed in the public interest; this act covers civil servants who perform public service duties, and affects both local and regional self-government employees.

Public sector employers

All individuals employed by public sector employers, including but not limited to; state foundations, state educational institutions, state health centers, and other public organizations, are considered to be civil servants. In Slovakia, there are two main categories of civil servants (public employees):

  1. Permanent

  2. Temporary

Whether you are a permanent or temporary civil servant, you should be aware of the Labour Code, which lays down specific conditions, rights and legislations regarding public employees.

Rights of civil servants

The Civil Service Act provides all the rights and obligations of public sector employees in Slovakia. Within the act, the following areas are covered (the below list is not exhaustive);

  • Working hours

  • Working obligations to ensure tasks are performed responsibly

  • Code of conduct (to refrain from abusing their position)

  • Salary

  • Other job performance benefits

Public employees cannot work more than 40 hours in any one week, although the act provides special regulations for overtime work and pay. Every civil servant is entitle to paid annual leave, which are typically 4 weeks per annum. Additional benefits include; food allowances, maternity leave, healthcare schemes, unemployment schemes and pension plans.

Condition to satisfy to join the civil service

  • Applicants must be physically and mentally capable of carrying out the tasks associated with the public employment position they have applied for

  • Candidates must not have a previous criminal record

  • Individuals must possess the required qualifications in line with the job requirements

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