CVS / OCT. 26, 2014
version 4, draft 4

How To Tailor Your CV For An Insurance Job

Your CV is your opportunity to introduce yourself to a potential employer and to advertise your experience, qualifications and suitability for the insurance role they are seeking to fill. It should also demonstrate how you can meet the employer’s needs and leave them in no doubt that you are the best candidate for the job.

Before you start

Even if you already work in the insurance industry, it’s still important to do some research before you begin drafting your CV.

- Research the company you are applying to carefully. Read their online mission statement and learn all you can about what they do.

- Find out if there are any insurance industry events coming up; get proactive and arrange informational interviews.

- Create a unique CV tailored for each job you apply for.

 

Insurance CV dos and don’ts

Do:

- Keep your CV concise and to the point; one to two pages is fine

- Use a font size of at least 10pt to make the document easy to read

- Use either a chronological or functional format

- Include clear and up-to-date contact information including a telephone number and professional email address

- Include details about your education, qualifications, work history together with a professional summary

Don’t:

- Use industry jargon

- Forget to include details of your accomplishments, rather than just your daily duties

- Include salary history details unless the job advertisement specifically asks for them

 

How to write a CV objective

The Objective section of your CV is your opportunity to tell the insurance employer what sort of work you are looking for and indicates to them that you know what you want from a role. How you phrase this can speak volumes about your work ethic and future ambitions; for example:

“Dynamic, resourceful and highly-motivated professional seeking full-time underwriter’s position.”

 

How to write a professional summary

The professional summary on your CV is your chance to briefly showcase who you are and what you can bring to the role. Keep it brief and use bullet points for maximum effect and readability. You could include:

- Details of your career to date

- Educational highlights; post-secondary education and professional industry qualifications you’ve earned

- Industry-specific skills and accomplishments

- Languages

- Computer and technical skills

 

Education and professional designations

Use this section of your CV to emphasise any training and qualifications you have undertaken that are relevant to the insurance industry as well as to the job you’re applying for. This is particularly important if you have little industry experience and are a new graduate or someone seeking a career change.

 

Work and volunteer experience

When it comes to including details of previous work experience, only include what’s actually relevant to the insurance job you are applying for.

Include two or three bulleted statements about each position you’ve held, remembering to keep them relevant to the employer’s specific needs.

Make each statement accomplishment-based, rather than just a list of tasks you’ve carried out.

Highlight occasions when you added value to your role and exceeded your employer’s expectations. Don’t just say that you provided good customer service; think about the following questions:

  • How many customers did you interact with?
  • What queries did you assist them with?
  • What programs, tools or other systems did you use?
  • Was your employer happy with the level of service you provided to your customers? How did you know?

Presentation

Present your CV professionally; use the same font throughout and choose nice quality, bonded paper. Make sure you proofread it thoroughly and ask a friend to go through it too, just to make sure you haven’t missed anything.

 

In conclusion

Your CV is the best tool you have for getting you noticed by a recruiter. Do your research before you start and tailor your CV for each job you apply for; the extra time and effort this takes will be worth it in the long run when you make it onto the shortlist and ultimately are invited for a job interview.

Image source: http://www.cooperators.ca

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