CAREER DEVELOPMENT / JAN. 30, 2014
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Why You Have to be an Entrepreneur Employee

If you want to remain successful over the long term in your professional career it’s time to think differently.

The strategy that worked for previous generations of “find a good job and keep it” could leave you sorely disappointed and without an income.

Here are 3 reasons why you should be thinking like a entrepreneur, NOT an employee:

#1 Stockholders don’t care about people

They care about profits.

That’s the short and the long version of the story.

Don’t be surprised if out of nowhere a pink slip finds your mailbox even when you were excelling in your position and your employer appears to be “stable” or even a leader in their market.

The truth is most companies will cut hours or lay off staff in order to preserve profit or to lesson losses.

It’s easy to find evidence of this trend just “Google” “business cut jobs profit” and you will find several stories about well known established companies that are laying off their workers with the exact same justification.

What’s NOT known is how much profit is enough?

What IS known is you are not the individual making this decision and if your salary is in the way of your company’s profits then it and you are in the danger zone.

#2 Time is money

What if I told you that in the end it’s not about what you have but HOW you lived your life?

What would you do differently if you knew you would live forever?

How would this change your plans for next week?

Most people respond that if they knew they would live forever then NOW they would get serious about starting a business or becoming an entrepreneur.

This is counterintuitive because knowing that you have limited time on earth should increase the urgency of NOW--not encourage complacency.

Entrepreneurs understand that time is money while the “employee” minded individuals are always seeking to get paid the greatest amount of money to do the least amount of work thus ensuring that eventually they will be outsourced, downsized, or laid off.

#3 Accountability

Ultimately you will be held accountable for the decisions you make. This includes the industry you chose to participate in and the employer you chose to work for.

Businesses demand that their employees generate a generous return on their investment. This means if the company you work for is paying you $15/hour they are expecting a net return much GREATER than this amount, EACH HOUR.

This is why when you have a slow afternoon at Starbucks the manager sends people home to save the day’s profit. This is also why big companies lay off workers near the end of a quarter, this is how they save profits.

As an entrepreneur minded employee you have a clear understanding of how your individual contribution impacts the bottom line of your company and you hold yourself accountable to this standard.

This means once you realize that your position is no longer helping the business in an meaningful way that you don’t wait for a pink slip to come instead you anticipate it’s arrival and proactively find a new opportunity.

I hope these tips help you avoid an untimely dismissal from an employer that you love.

Now it’s over to you.

How do you feel about thinking like an entrepreneur at work?

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