JOB SEARCH / FEB. 18, 2015
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How to Work with a Recruiter

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The idea of working with a recruiter doesn’t always conjure the best memories in the world. Whilst the industry hasn’t always commanded the greatest reputation, there’s no denying working with a recruiter does bring a great many benefits. If you’re working with a recruiter to get back into employment again, it can either go really well or really badly.

Okay, sometimes you’re going to have to deal with a bad recruiter, but this doesn’t mean that you can’t make things easier. In this blog, we’re going to take a look at some of the ways you can make working with a recruiter easy and simple.

Keep a Daybook

It’s not uncommon for job seekers to apply for, literally, hundreds of jobs. When the recruiter calls back, it’s also not uncommon for the person to have no idea what job they’re talking about. No recruiter would be offended by this. They know how it works.

This is why you should keep a daybook and write down exactly what you’ve applied for. If you don’t know who the employer is, just write the job title as it’s been advertised. It’s quite common for employers to advertise for jobs anonymously in order to hide the fact they’re recruiting from their competitors. This is especially the case with bigger companies.

A daybook will make things easier because when the recruiter calls, you’ll always know which job they’re talking about. It saves any wasted time and it ensures you don’t have to try to talk your way through a conversation where you’re like a deer in headlights.

Getting the Calls Right

One of the biggest criticisms recruiters receive is they never return calls. This isn’t because they don’t care about their jobs or that they’re rude. It’s the way their hours work. Most recruiters have targets they have to meet. They have to call a certain number of potential employers every day. They will usually work during core business hours, so this is between eight in the morning and six in the evening.

To increase your chances of getting a call, try to call close to the rush-hour. This is when a recruiter is least likely to be on the phone to a potential employer.

Remember, the recruiter has to juggle your needs and the client’s needs.

Make it Easy for Them

You are a product.

This isn’t a nice way to think about yourself, but it’s true. The job of a recruiter is to find their clients employees to work for them. They’re the ones paying them extortionate amounts of money to keep their recruitment business afloat. It’s also why many recruitment agencies are low-cost or free for candidates.

Make things easy for them by thinking about how you would sell yourself. Think about your unique selling point and how this would come off to an employer. The recruiter will take this unique selling point and attempt to use it to net you an interview, which is when your personality and charisma has to step in.

So many candidates don’t make it easy for recruiters because they give the bare basics and nothing else. It’s all well and good knowing about your education and work history, but that’s rarely enough. The recruiter then has to sell a product they don’t know a great deal about. They have to string the process out to find an employer willing to take such a candidate or the recruiter has to spend more time trying to discover your unique selling point.

Overall, working with a recruiter is a two-way relationship. They can only do their best for you if you put the effort in to make things easier for them. Give it your all, and work with them as if they were the employer.

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