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WORKING ABROAD / DEC. 27, 2012
version 36, draft 36

Working Conditions in Japan

japane work force
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Japan is one of the top three economies of the world, sustaining its position as a global financial centre despite the economic crisis. The country boasts a health system of the highest standards, catering to its citizens, nationals and residents with regards to sickness, health and other well-being issues. The Japanese workforce is world renowned for being dedicated and hard working, contributing to their country’s labor force by being motivated and determined.

The Japanese government supports the work force through public services such as health care, education, welfare, law enforcement, civil policing and general order within the country. Individuals are encouraged to work and generate an income, whilst contributing to the social security system and taking advantage of the governmental services.

The following is a brief outline of the advantages of working in Japan: 

The statutory annual leave in Japan is dependent on the period of time that an individual has been working for. Workers who have been employed for a period of 6 months and more and have worked for 80% or more of each working day are entitled to annual paid leave. The number of days that each individual can take off will be determined according to the months they have worked. For example a person working for 1.5 years can take a total of 11 days off in a year, while an individual working for 5.5 years can take 18 full days off.

 

In accordance with the Japanese law, all employees are entitled to a minimum of one day off every week. This totals to a total of 4 days off within a four week month. A number of companies do not follow the rule with regards to public holidays, often requiring individuals to work through the national holidays as well as Sundays. As a result of this, individuals are able to take their one day holiday at any point during the period of the one week.

 

The Japanese law indicates that individuals are required to work a minimum of 40 hours a week; however the majority of the workforce tends to work overtime. As a growing number of employees work overtime, the average working week often averages up to 48-50 hours a week. Employees working overtime become entitled to additional days off in their annual paid leave.


 

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