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How to Market a Product in Poland

If you understand the history of Poland, you cannot help but be awed by the nation’s emergence from economic ruins about three decades ago to become the largest and sixth-largest economy in Central Europe and the European Union, respectively. It is also ranked 42nd on the list of the freest economies in the world, making it an attractive market for entrepreneurs. The downside is that a free market encourages competition, and it takes more than basic marketing skills to sell a product. It is, therefore, critical that you understand what catches the attention of consumers in the economy.

See Also: 5 Great Career Options in Advertising

1. Research

The Polish consumer market is sophisticated and diverse. Understand your target clientele and marketing strategies that will draw their attention. Television and radio advertising remain the most popular ways of marketing in the country due to the high number of people they can reach.  The cost, however, has risen sharply in the recent years due to growing demand. Internet marketing in Poland is common as more people gain access to the internet. So, conduct research on what suits your target market and fits your budget best.


2. Strategize Your Distribution

The end results of marketing should be sales. Consumers will be more thrilled to work with your product if it is readily available to try it. Poles buy things in small shops in the rural areas and in super or hypermarkets in large towns.  Understand your target market and place products in platforms accessible to them before you begin your marketing campaign.

3. Employ Direct Marketing

Direct selling in Poland grew by 6.8 percent between 2010 and 2013, which signifies a growing preference for consumers to engage directly with the producer or marketer of a product. You can do direct marketing via the internet, mobile phone or even person to person. Polish people are social, enjoy talking and a meeting is paramount for any business deal to take place. Reaching and speaking to your target customers, therefore, may not be difficult.

4. Network

Unless you are confident in your brand’s outstanding indigenous merits, introducing a new product can be an arduous endeavor in Poland.  Work with a complimenting brand to reach a bigger clientele.  Join the Polish Marketing Association to meet stakeholders in the marketing industry, learn and network.

5. Understand Business Etiquette

A successful marketing strategy in Poland must include behavior that your target market deems appropriate in a business setting. You are more likely to leave an excellent impression in your customers’ minds if you maintain an approach that honors their business etiquette. Basic tips include a firm handshake, greeting everyone individually when dealing with a group and making an appointment in advance if you want to meet a customer. Punctuality and keeping your word is taken extremely serious in Poland. Clear presentations and evidence to back your claims is an admirable quality in the country.  Use available resources such as online material and etiquette coaches to understand how to treat customers.

6. Regard Cultural Sensitivity

The Poles are proud of their nationality and culture. Cultural sensitivity is critical in effective marketing. The intricacies of the Poles’ superstitions and beliefs can work for or against your marketing strategy.  Avoid cultural taboos in your marketing campaigns and taglines. For example, statements touching on religion, abortion, and sexual orientation can earn your product more controversy than sales. Your practices when dealing with customers must also be comfortable with the Poles. Polish people, for example, believe that some habits such as shaking hands in a doorway or giving a customer flowers in an even number brings bad luck.

See Also: How to Differentiate Between Advertising and Promotion

Like Poland’s economic journey over the last 25 years, succeeding in marketing, requires an exclusive focus on what makes your product stand out. Profitable marketing in Poland requires a deeper look at what the product means to the people’s culture and history, but also calls for a strategy that will maintain competitiveness as well.

Would you market your product in Poland? What marketing strategies would you use? Let us know in the comments section below.