Remuneration and Pensions - Denmark

retirment Denmark

All Members of the Danish Parliament receive remuneration for their work. It comprises a basic remuneration and weighting.

According to the Parliamentary Election Act of Denmark. Members of Parliament (MPs) are obliged to receive basic remuneration and weighting, i.e. they can not refuse to accept remuneration for their work. The amount of MPs' remuneration is also laid down in the Parliamentary Election Act of Denmark.

Weighting I is paid to MPs who reside in Denmark and is tax-free.

Weighting II is paid to MPs elected in Greenland and the Faroe Islands and is also tax-free.

 


 

The Speaker of the Danish Parliament receives remuneration in accordance with the same rules that apply to the Prime Minister's remuneration. The Speaker is also entitled to severance pay and a pension in accordance with the same rules that apply to the Prime Minister.

 

An ordinary MP who leaves Parliament due to a general election or to sickness receives supplementary remuneration corresponding to the basic remuneration for 12-24 months after leaving. The period depends on how long the person in question has been an MP.
Supplementary remuneration is paid in full up to and including the twelfth month. From the thirteenth month any income from employment and other income, as well as severance pay and pension, etc., is set off.

 

All MPs are entitled to a pension when they have been MPs for at least a year during one or more periods. MPs elected before 1 July 2007 are entitled to a parliamentary pension when they turn 60. MPs elected after 1 July 2007 are entitled to a parliamentary pension when they reach the age at which they can take early retirement. However, nobody receives a parliamentary pension as long as he or she receives basic remuneration or supplementary remuneration.

The highest pension is payable after 20 years' membership and, for former MPs who were MPs wholly or partly after 1 January 2000 or later, it comprises DKK 28,800 per month.