Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
LEADERSHIP / MAY. 06, 2016
version 8, draft 8

Should You Fire Your Boss?

One of the most important decisions a company can make is simply who they hire to fill the position of manager. Unfortunately, however, it’s a decision that many get wrong. In fact, a Gallup study found that companies get it wrong 82% of the time. Simply put: great managers are rare office-dwelling creatures.

See Also: 7 Things Your Boss Does That Are Absolute Deal Breakers

If you think you have a great boss, then consider yourself extremely lucky because eight out of 10 people would gladly swap their horrible bosses with your awesome one. If, however, you feel like you’re being punished for all your hard work with a mean, incompetent, micromanaging boss, know that there’s light at the end of the tunnel.

Whether they’re constantly humiliating you in public, blaming you for their own mistakes, taking credit for all your hard work, or micromanaging every little thing you’re tasked with, one thing’s for sure: they’ve got to go. It sounds easier said than done, but if they do any of the following things, getting your boss fired is the best thing you can do for yourself, your colleagues, and the company itself.

1. Communication Is a One-Way Street

Man placing hand in front of woman
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A manager’s responsibilities are self-explanatory: they’re to contribute to the company’s smooth operation by managing a team of employees as effectively as possible. In other words, they’re to provide guidance and give orders and instructions to their team to work toward a common goal. However, if shooting orders left, right, and center is all they do, and they do not listen to employees, then productivity will inevitably drop – fast.

In fact, various studies show that listening to employees made them more engaged in their work and, as a result, companies generated 43% more revenue and employees took only 2.7 sick days compared to the 6.2 days taken by their disengaged counterparts. And we all know how expensive workplace absenteeism can be both to a company and to the economy.

Communication between managers and their subordinates should not be a one-way-street, and supervisors should instead hear what their team has to say. After all, their feedback on a specific project or company policy could be extremely valuable to the organization’s growth.

2. They Abuse Their Power

Puppeteer with employees
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Uncle Ben once wisely told Peter Parker, aka Spider-Man, that with great power comes great responsibility. Unfortunately, however, not everyone sees it that way and instead use their power to do unspeakable things: just look at Hitler or Stalin, for example.

Fortunately, your boss isn’t Hitler (hopefully) but that doesn’t mean they haven’t fallen into the trap of abusing their power – which, as can be imagined, is rather easy to do, especially in a competitive workplace setting. But this abuse of power spells disaster for employees, their health and mental wellbeing. Stressed employees, in turn, can spell disaster for the company as productivity is reduced, absenteeism levels hit the roof, and employees begin walking out. As a result, this damages the company’s image.

Let’s say your manager is forcing you to work late every day to complete a project, and then threatens to report you – or worse, fire you – if you refuse to stay late. He’s abusing his power. And it’s up to you to act accordingly.

3. They Throw Employees Under the Bus

Two women pointing at each other
Shutterstock

So, $100 million seemingly vanished into thin air – it’s not that big of a deal. Okay, it is kind of a big deal (actually, it’s a huge deal), but when your boss starts pointing his finger at people, then a missing $100 million might not be your only problem here.

Unless the $100 million that went missing was indeed that individual’s fault your boss is pointing his finger at – let’s say that they stole it to buy themselves a 10-bedroom beachfront mansion in Malibu – then chances are your boss’ intentions were to cover his ass. That doesn’t necessarily mean he was the one who made the money disappear; it just means that he would much rather throw employees under the bus than jeopardize his job.

An effective manager takes responsibility for and owns bad decisions, whether they were his own or those of his employees; he takes responsibility for problems and mistakes, and he encourages his team to do the same. He doesn’t place all the blame on others but rather holds himself accountable for his team’s failures as much as their successes.

See Also: How Does a Terrible Boss Really Affect You?

Have you ever gotten a bad boss fired? How did you go about it, and what led you to do so? Tell us in the comments section below, and don’t forget to share this article with family and friends who may be currently despairing over a horrible boss of their own!

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