Career Testing
Career Testing
Career Testing
UNEMPLOYMENT / JUL. 24, 2014
version 2, draft 2

How To Hide Your Unemployed Status From Family and Friends

When a person has friends or family members who are successful at their careers and are landing raises and promotions on a regular basis, being unemployed can be embarrassing and makes a person feel like a failure. This is why sometimes a jobless individual will hide it from family and friends.

A person’s employment is usually one of the first things that come up in a conversation, whether it’s someone that you have just met, a family member you haven’t seen in a longtime or a topic that is talked about in a group discussion. Therefore, it’s very difficult to hide the fact that you’re out of work, but it is possible.

In today’s economy, the labor force is in a crisis: the real unemployment rate is considered to be in the late-teens and early-20s, 40 percent of millennials account for the entire jobless population and the long-term unemployed represent nearly one-third (30 percent) of the nation’s jobless rate. Indeed, locating a job or some kind of employment is an easier said than done endeavor.

Of course, a person shouldn’t purposefully lie to others, but if you wish to conceal your unemployed status from your family and friends then here are six tips to incorporate into your scheme.

Vague

“How’s work?” “What’s new at the office?” and “Are you still working at the same company?” are usually some of the most common questions an acquaintance or a distant relative will ask. Rather than going into great detail, you can offer a vague response: “It’s fine,” “The company hasn’t done much” or “Nothing is new at office.” Another answer could be directly related to the other person: “What’s new at your work?” “Tell me about your interesting field,” or “Have you been working your way up the ladder?”

This will suffice the person’s appetite for work-related discussions.

Evasion

When a family member starts talking about work or the quartet you’re with initiates a conversation about work, try to evade the discussion entirely. This can be done by asking direct questions to the person(s), changing the subject or taking yourself out of the situation (heading to the bathroom, leaving early or getting fresh air).

Online status

Instead of updating your LinkedIn, Facebook or Twitter profiles to indicate that you have lost your employment status with your company, wait until you have found a new job. In addition, don’t participate on any social networks throughout regular business hours because then this may hint that you’re jobless and goofing off.

Workday

Being out of work pretty much implies that you’re working harder than ever before: updating your resume, searching for new employment opportunities, participating in various interviews and so on. Rather than being at home, signing into Facebook and answering the phone, be inactive online, don’t answer the phone at home unless it’s for work and don’t head out to popular hotspots throughout the workday.

Recluse

If you’re life revolves around being in the company of others then think about becoming a recluse for a little while. Just tell your friends and family that you don’t feel well, you’re going through a difficult time at the moment or you need time to re-evaluate your life, values and career for some time. This suggests to people you need to be alone but it doesn’t require an extensive explanation.

Freelancing, volunteering and temping

A lot of unemployed people sit at home and play the waiting game expecting a phone call from a potential employer. Instead of doing this, be active by freelancing your skills (writing, web designing and marketing), volunteering at a charity or taking part in temporary positions. If a family member or friend discovers this fact then you can simply state that you’re seeking out career alternatives – this doesn’t necessarily indicate that you’re jobless.

Nobody likes to be out of work because it can be a humiliating and morose experience, especially as other people in your social circle get ahead in their career path. It’s important to not feel ashamed and to simply trek on without letting other individuals influence your decisions or dampen your spirits.

Have you ever hidden your unemployment status from your friends and family? Let us know in the comment section.

 

Image by Audio Luci Store via Flickr.

Get our FREE eBook!
'6 Steps to Landing Your Next Job'

LEAVE A COMMENT

0 comments

 

RELATED ARTICLES

How to Handle the Situation When Your Partner is Unemployed
UNEMPLOYMENT / MAR 06, 2015

Unemployment leads to financial stress and that can wreak havoc to the relationship between spouses or partners. This stressful situation can lead to divorce or the...

How To Determine Your Rights As An Unemployed Person
UNEMPLOYMENT / AUG 02, 2014

At the beginning of an episode from the hit television show “Seinfeld,” Jerry Seinfeld made a joke that once you begin working you are repeatedly reminded of the...

video games addicts
UNEMPLOYMENT / MAR 27, 2015

There are few things more tempting than the lure of video games and TV when you are laid off. You may be spending a good deal of time hunting for a job, but nowhere near...

How to Support Your Family When You Have Been Fired
UNEMPLOYMENT / JUL 18, 2014

When a person is let go from their company, the government offers various social safety nets to ensure that they won’t land on the streets in the event of a job loss. On...

How to Find Free Activities in Your Area When Unemployed
UNEMPLOYMENT / APR 21, 2015

Being unemployed means you’re free to spend your days as you wish – but it also means you could find yourself with a serious case of boredom when you find out how many...

super woman
UNEMPLOYMENT / MAR 27, 2015

If you have ever been fired or laid off, you know how "blue" you can get. You start to doubt your abilities as a professional or even as an individual, and you often find...

Get our FREE eBook!
'6 Steps to Landing Your Next Job'
G up arrow