How To Withdraw Your Job Application Properly

There may be many reasons you want to withdraw your job application. Perhaps you are not sure about the job or got a better job offer. Then again, you might have given your application some thought and the position doesn’t seem to be a good fit for you anymore. While changing your mind about jobs isn’t something you do often – I hope – It is certainly not a crime. However, it will be much easier for you if you know how to handle it properly. 

See Also: How to Choose Between Two Job Offers

If you no longer have any interest in the job, you have to let employers know. But this should only happen after you have been called in for an interview. So if you haven’t heard back from employers since you’ve sent them your resume, you don’t need to tell them you want to withdraw your application.

If you are certain that you want to withdraw your application, there are three main ways of doing it:

1. Send an Email

woman writing an email

The best way to withdraw your application is through an email. Check out this email template that should give you an idea about how you will need to write yours and explain to employers your application withdrawal.

Dear [Name of Contact],

Thank you for considering me for the [Name of Position] and for inviting me in for an interview at [Name of Company]. Although, I was pleased to meet you and learn more about the role, after careful consideration I feel that this is not the right fit for me at this time. As such I would like to formally withdraw my application. I sincerely appreciate the opportunity and hope you find a worthy candidate.

Again, thank you for your consideration

[Your Name]

Sending them an email is like saying thanks but no thanks. This way you are letting them know that you appreciated the time and effort they’ve put into meeting you or inviting you in for an interview but for some reason – that you will have to give – you won’t be taking the application any further.

2. Make a Phone Call

If you have already met the hiring manager or the person who calls the shots and built some rapport, then it might be more fitting – and professional, to call him up and let him know about your decision. When doing so ask specifically for the hiring manager and avoid leaving a recorded message on their voicemail. This is something that he should hear directly from you. You might even get the chance to discuss future openings or referrals to other jobs that fit your qualifications better.

3. Keep in Touch

business men shaking hands

If you have already attended the job interview, there is no reason employers should feel betrayed by your decision not to accept the job. To make things easier for you and them, you can tell them that you might be able to help – either by suggesting someone you know for the position or simply leaving the door open for the future. Since you have already made the contacts, it would be a shame if you two didn’t stay in touch right? Follow the employer on LinkedIn and get involved in what they are working on.

If you have changed your mind over a position, it’s good manners to inform employers about your decision. You don’t want to just not turn up to a pre-arranged interview. That will not make you look good, and you can’t afford to burn any bridges, especially when you are job hunting.

Have you ever had to withdraw a job application? How did you do it? Let me know in the comments section below…




Developed & managed by DQ Media

CareerAddict and the CareerAddict Logo are registered trademarks of DeltaQuest Media Holding ApS

Credit card payments collected by DELTAQUEST Media (Ireland) Ltd, Company No IE548227, Registered address: The Black Church, St. Mary’s Place, Dublin 7, Ireland

</script> </script>