MORE ON CAREERADDICT

20 Fulfilling Jobs for People with Anxiety

A stressed young woman sitting at her desk in an office
TORWAISTUDIO / Shutterstock.com

If the thought of going to work makes you panic, it probably means that your job isn’t right for your personality and that you should start looking for alternatives.

But finding another job – and one that you will enjoy – is difficult enough, without throwing your anxiety disorder into the mix.

The good news is that there are many careers out there to choose from that you can feel comfortable with and happy in, and where you can transform your life and make that anxious feeling melt away.

So, if you’re looking for an escape route, check out these 20 low-stress and fulfilling jobs for people with anxiety!

 


 

1. Graphic Designer

If you have a creative flair, a career in graphic design can be ideal for you.

As a graphic designer, you can choose to work on a freelance basis or within a studio but will spend most of the day behind your screen creating cool and captivating graphics.

Average salary: $48,700 / £33,000

 

2. Writer

A career in writing is similar to that of a graphic designer. There will be a limited amount of interaction with other team members, and you will have the freedom to get stuck in your work and let your creative juices flow without feeling stressed or anxious.

Average salary: $61,820 / £23,247

 

3. Fitness Trainer

If you don’t enjoy interacting with strangers, you might be wondering how a fitness trainer made the cut, but hear me out!

As a trainer, you won’t be in the spotlight; your client will. You will also feel more satisfied as you are helping someone reach their goals and will, generally, feel healthier as you will also be working out on a daily basis.

Average salary: $39,210 / £22,000

 

4. Beautician

As a beautician, you’ll be dealing with a lot of clients but on a one-on-one basis, which is ideal for people that suffer from social anxiety. The focus will also be on your client and the procedure that you are doing, so you won’t have to put any attention on yourself.

Average salary: $30,080 / £19,500

 

5. Cosmetologist

If you have an interest in the creative arts, cosmetology is a great outlet for many people that suffer from depression. You can create beautiful masterpieces with your clients’ hair and makeup, and make them feel happy as a result, which will also make you feel more satisfied with your work.

Average salary: $24,900 / £20,457

 

6. Plumber

Positions that allow you to work independently are best suited for people that suffer from an anxiety disorder. As a plumber, you will be so busy with working with your hands and your brain solving plumbing issues that you won’t have time to think about your worries.

Average salary: $52,590 / £27,500

 

7. Medical Lab Technician

Want to be part of a big project working behind the scenes? You can help a good cause as a lab technician, without being in the spotlight. As a lab technician, you’ll mainly collect samples from patients to help form a diagnosis and devise a treatment plan.

Average salary: $51,770 / £22,500

 

8. Vet Technician

If you love all types of animals, you can work as a vet tech and care for animals by diagnosing and treating conditions. You’ll be working alongside a clinic’s vet and will play a large role in administering care to all kinds of animals in need. To be successful, you’ll need to have a calm personality, and you should be able to work under pressure.

Average salary: $33,400 / £40,000

 

9. Software Developer

Working in technology is a great fit for someone who suffers from anxiety. In such a popular job as that of a software developer, you can work from home or in an office, and you will produce most of your work behind a screen without having to consult with anyone.

Average salary: $103,560 / £45,000

 

10. Florist

If you’ve got green fingers and have a creative flair, you’ll find happiness working as a florist. Your main duties will involve caring for plants and flowers and creating arrangements for special occasions.

Average salary: $26,350 / £15,375

 

 

11. Baker

Believe it or not, culinary therapy is actually a thing! Indeed, many people suffering from anxiety find baked goods a great way of coping with stress – the process of measuring and adding ingredients to create tasty goods is a great release for most! The bonus? When you get really good at it, you can make a living out of it, too!

Average salary: $25,090 / £26,875

 

12. Back Office Worker

Many back office jobs are typically low-stress and can be great for people with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD). You simply need to check through documents and input data into computerised systems.

Average salary: $33,680 / £18,500

 

13. Dog Trainer

If you prefer hanging out with your furry friends all day, you should consider becoming a dog trainer. Although it will take a while to get certified, the job will have great therapeutic effects; you’ll feel much more satisfied working with animals than complex humans all day.

Average salary: $25,770 / £20,250

 

14. Accountant

Although accountancy is generally deemed a stressful career, day-to-day activities will usually be monotonous and stress-free. If you have a knack for numbers and don’t mind repeating the same tasks day in and day out, then this could be a lucrative profession for you.

Average salary: $69,350 / £31,500

 

15. Artist

Following a career as an artist can be a great coping method and form of self-expression if you suffer from anxiety. Indeed, ‘research has shown that art making can have a profound impact on a person’s physical and psychological wellbeing’, according to New York University clinical assistant professor Marygrace Berberian. So, if you want to channel your worries and create visualisations, consider becoming an artist.

Average salary: $33,440 / £19,575

 

16. Truck Driver

If you enjoy your own company and can spend hours on the road, then working as a truck driver could be for you. The only interaction you’ll have is with suppliers and clients when you pick up goods and transfer them to the destination. However, after a while, life on the road can become tiring, so it’s important to weigh up the pros and cons of this position before jumping head first in.

Average salary: $42,480 / £22,500

 

17. Jewellery Maker

If you have a talent for making unique jewellery, why not turn your hobby into a business? You can start by selling your goods online, through websites like Etsy and eBay; if your sales pick up, you can then invest your earnings in creating a branded online store.

Average salary: $37,060 / £33,000

 

18. Translator

If you have a fondness of foreign languages, you could consider becoming a translator. This job allows you to work from home no matter where you are in the world, while translators are always in high demand. All you need to do is translate text or documents from one language into the desired language and deliver your services to clients in a timely manner.

Average salary: $46,120 / £29,000

 

19. Video Editor

The job of a video editor is of low intensity compared to other workers of a creative studio. Video editors are given the task of fine-tuning film and content to make a catchy and memorable video. While they work to deadlines, their physical schedule is manageable and won’t interfere with their anxiety.

Average salary: $58,210 / £31,500

 

20. Librarian

If you’re somewhat of a bookworm and don’t like interacting much with strangers, you can find your passion between the bookshelves of a library. You’ll be responsible for organising books, checking stock and recommending new reads; and since you’re passionate about books, it won’t cause you any anxiety.

Average salary: $58,520 / £30,250

 


 

No matter what type of anxiety you are dealing with, there’s a job out there that has your name on it. The key is to find a low-stress job in a sector that you are interested in.

Have you found the best job for you on this list? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

Salaries are intended as a guide and vary depending on employer and level of experience.

Salary information is based on data compiled and published by a variety of sources, including the BLS Occupational Outlook Handbook and the National Careers Service.