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10 Jobs for People With Disabilities

As someone with a disability, if you’ve found yourself looking for employment, you don’t have to look much further. All you have to do is pick a job!!

While the unemployment rate of Americans with disabilities was 10.7% in April (almost 6% more than the national average of people without), healthcare’s growing importance on the economy has a particular impact on job seekers with a disability. In fact, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was amended in 2014 requiring that all government agencies – as well as companies with a federal contract and any company that does business with another company that gets money from the federal government – to strive for a workforce that is made up of at least 7% of people with disabilities.

And there are hundreds of organizations all over the country that help the estimated 54 million Americans with a disability find employment in fields like healthcare, finance, and business. Here are the 10 best jobs you can find as someone with a disability.

See Also: Disabilities in the Workplace

Pharmacy Technician

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Although not a particularly financially rewarding career, compared to the rest of the professions on this list, pharmacy technicians still make a fair amount of money. Annual wages average $29,300 and 34,700 jobs are expected to become available over the next eight years.

Vocational Counselor

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As a vocational counselor, you’ll help people make decisions about careers and educational programs, a role that requires a master’s degree in career counseling or applied psychology. Vocational counselors make about $53,610 a year.

Pharmaceutical Sales

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A job in pharmaceutical sales is quite a popular career choice for disabled job seekers as it offers excellent potential for career growth, income, and benefits. On average, professionals in this field make $56,620 a year.

Market Research Analyst

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As a market research analyst, you’ll gather and analyze data on consumers and competitors. You’ll use this data to examine the potential sales of a product or service, and the money’s not bad. Annual wages average $60,300.

Accountant / Auditor

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If you love working with numbers, you might want to consider a career in accounting or auditing. And if you need convincing, just look at the salary you’ll be potentially making: $63,550 per month.

Wholesale Sales Representative

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Generally speaking, you only need a high school diploma to find employment as a wholesale sales representative – and you don’t even need previous experience. Most companies provide on-the-job training which can last up to a year, and you’ll earn an average $74,970 per year. Not too shabby!

Financial Analyst

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With some 32,300 jobs expected to be created by 2024, finding employment as a financial analyst will not be particularly difficult. But, competition may be fierce, especially when you consider the potential salary you could earn: $76,950 a year.

Management Consultant

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If you’re quite business savvy, you might want to consider a career in management consulting, especially if you want to earn, on average, $78,600 per year. Although a master’s degree isn’t required for the job, it can help you land a more financially rewarding offer.

Software Engineer

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As technology evolves and becomes a bigger part of everyday life, so does the need for technology professionals. In fact, software engineer jobs are predicted to grow by as much as 17% by 2024. Although self-taught skills could land you a job, formal education could you potentially help you earn an average annual salary of $85,430.  

Physician Assistant

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Physician assistants earn the most on this list, with $90,930 per year. They also have the best job outlook, with a 30% growth rate. You’ll typically need a master’s degree from an accredited educational program as well as licensing to pursue a career in this highly rewarding field.

See Also: 10 Things You Should Never Say to a Person With an Invisible Disability

What other jobs are ideal for people with disabilities? Tell us in the comments section below!

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